Tag Archives: militaryfamilies

Upcoming Webinar – Month of the Family Caregiver: Organizations Responding to Hidden Heroes

Created using Canva.com
Created using Canva.com

November is National Family Caregiver Month!

During this month we like to show our appreciation for all of the hard work and sacrifices family caregivers make for their loved ones. This year we have created a learning opportunity for family caregivers to learn more about two organizations and their missions to support all caregivers but especially the 5.5 million military caregivers in the United States. The responsibilities of a military caregiver may include a wounded service member but also a person with a special healthcare need or development disability.

We will be highlighting two organizations, Easterseals and Operation Family Caregiver (OFC), during this webinar and have representatives from both participate in an engaging session on their organizations’ response to military caregiving and how these resources can help the caregiver.

Below is more information about each of the organizations that will have representatives joining us in our Month of the Family Caregiver: Organizations Responding to Hidden Heroes webinar.

Easterseals has been helping individuals with disabilities and special needs, and their families for over 100 years through services and support surrounding medical rehabilitation, employment and training, children’s services, adult and senior services, and camping and recreation. More recently Easterseals has responded to military caregiving by providing support for caregivers and their families through respite care, inclusive childcare, employment and career services, transportation, behavioral/physical health services and advocacy at the federal and local levels.

Operation Family Caregiver (OFC) is a program within the Rosalynn Carter Institute (RCI) for Caregiving at Georgia Southwestern State University. RCI supports caregivers – both family and professional caregivers through advocacy, education, research and service. OFC coaches the families of returning service members and veterans to manage the difficulties they face when returning. The program has been implemented across the nation and within communities to teach military families how to best navigate the challenges that come with caregiving in order to build a stronger family network.

 

Certificate of Completion Available!

The MFLN Military Caregiving concentration will provide a Certificate of Completion following this session.

Interested in Joining the Webinar?

To join this event, simply click on Month of the Military Caregiver: Organizations Responding to Hidden Heroes. The webinar is hosted by the Department of Defense APAN system, but is open to the public.

If you cannot connect to the APAN site, an alternative viewing of this presentation will be running on YouTube Live. Mobile options for YouTube Live are available on all Apple and Android devices.


This MFLN-Military Caregiving concentration blog post was published on October 28, 2016.

 

 

Military Caregiving Virtual Learning Event #3 – Mark Your Calendar!

VLE Image Event #3

VLE Session #3: Empowering Caregivers and Families

Join the MFLN Military Caregiving team as we continue learning new skills and strategies for improved communication in times of crisis in the final session of our three-part Virtual Learning Event (VLE) beginning at 11:00 a.m. EDT on Wednesday, October 26.

In session three of the VLE entitled, Empowering Caregivers and Families, we will provide an in-depth look at effective practices for communicating sensitive topics. Highlighting real-life challenges and solutions, case studies, practices from the field and a panel of professionals will be employed in addressing some of the most pressing communication issues military helping professionals face.

The VLE is centered on the theme of Sensitive Topics in Caregiving: Tough Questions and Complex Answers. Our goal with this VLE is to address military family service providers’ tough questions with our expert presenters’ complex answers. If you missed VLE Session #1 (Interpersonal Relationships) or VLE Session #2 (Crisis Communication) it is still not too late to participate and receive continuing education credit or a certificate of completion.

We hope you join us for the final session of the 2016 VLE, October 26th. To learn more about this VLE and previous sessions, click on 2016 MFLN Military Caregiving VLE.

 

Certificate of Completion Available!

The MFLN Military Caregiving concentration will provide a Certificate of Completion following this session.

Interested in Joining the Webinar?

To join this event, simply click on Empowering Caregivers and Families. The webinar is hosted by the Department of Defense APAN system, but is open to the public.

If you cannot connect to the APAN site, an alternative viewing of this presentation will be running on YouTube Live. Mobile options for YouTube Live are available on all Apple and Android devices.

 


This MFLN-Military Caregiving concentration blog post was published on October 21, 2016.

 

Military Caregiving Virtual Learning Event #2 – Don’t miss it!

VLE Image Event #2

VLE Session #2: Challenges Facing Families in Crisis

Join the MFLN Military Caregiving team as we focus on learning new skills and strategies for improved communication in times of crisis in the second session of our three-part Virtual Learning Event (VLE) beginning at 11:00 a.m. EDT on Wednesday, October 19.

In session two of the VLE entitled, Challenges Facing Families in Crisis, we will address some of the unique challenges military families face and examine ways to support them. Throughout this event, our speaker, Michelle Lewis MSW will focus on risk factors that increase military families’ vulnerability during crisis, resources for military families in crisis, as well as ways mental health concerns increase challenges for military families.

The VLE is centered on the theme of Sensitive Topics in Caregiving: Tough Questions and Complex Answers. Our goal with this VLE is to address military family service providers’ tough questions with our expert presenters’ complex answers.

We hope you join us for the second session of the 2016 VLE, October 19th. To learn more about this VLE and the other sessions, click on 2016 MFLN Military Caregiving VLE.

 

CEU Credit Available!

The MFLN has applied for 1.5 National Association of Social Workers (NASW) continuing education credit for credentialed participants. Certificates of Completion will also be available for training hours as well. For more information on CEU credits go to: NASW Continuing Education Instructions.

Interested in Joining the Webinar?

To join this event, simply click on Challenges Facing Families in Crisis. The webinar is hosted by the Department of Defense APAN system, but is open to the public.

If you cannot connect to the APAN site, an alternative viewing of this presentation will be running on YouTube Live. Mobile options for YouTube Live are available on all Apple and Android devices.

 

This MFLN-Military Caregiving concentration blog post was published on October 14, 2016.

 

Part 4: How Learning Styles Can Alter the Way Military Families Process Information

Adul Learning Series

As helping professionals, we tend to acquire and process information differently as we learn new things, this is true of all adults including Military Families. By understanding the principles of adult learning, it may help you to better connect with families in order to provide the highest quality education that will meet their needs.

There are four principles of adult learning identified by Malcolm Knowles, known as the pioneer of adult learning. We have previously discussed (1) Autonomous and Self-Directed, (2) Life Experiences and Knowledges, and (3) Goal-Oriented. In this blog we will address the final principal of adult learning (4) Practical.

 

Practical

Adults are practical and like to be able to apply their knowledge. New concepts and theories can be understood and taught, however if there is a lack of opportunities for the new skill, theory, or concept to be applied many adults will not retain the information.

When providing instruction or information for adults be mindful of having opportunities for your students to practice the new information or skill with others. Provide opportunities to apply new information through role play, by working through scenarios, or by completing the new skill.

 

Next month the MFLN Military Caregiving concentration will be discussing adult learning styles, which will provide a deeper understanding of how adults learn and process information.

 

This MFLN-Military Caregiving concentration blog post was published on October 7, 2016.

 

 

 

Upcoming Military Caregiving Virtual Learning Event #1 – Mark Your Calendars!

VLE Image Event #1
VLE Session #1: Communication for Interpersonal Relationships

Join the MFLN Military Caregiving team as we focus on learning new skills and strategies for improved communication in times of crisis in this three-part Virtual Learning Event (VLE) beginning at 11:00 a.m. EDT on Wednesday, October 12.

In session one of the VLE entitled, Communication for Interpersonal Relationships, we will cover basic aspects of interpersonal communication such as reasons for learning about interpersonal communication, types of interpersonal communication goals, and kinds of interpersonal communication tasks. During this interactive session, our speaker, Leanne Knobloch Ph.D. will provide guidelines for disclosing information, maintaining relationships, providing comfort as well as managing conflict.

The VLE is centered on the theme of Sensitive Topics in Caregiving: Tough Questions and Complex Answers. Our goal with this VLE is to address military family service providers’ tough questions with our expert presenters’ complex answers.

We hope you join us for the first session of the 2016 VLE, October 12th. To learn more about this VLE and the other sessions, click on 2016 MFLN Military Caregiving VLE.

 

CEU Credit Available!

The MFLN has applied for 1.5 National Association of Social Workers (NASW) continuing education credit for credentialed participants. Certificates of Completion will also be available for training hours as well. For more information on CEU credits go to: NASW Continuing Education Instructions.

Interested in Joining the Webinar?

To join this event, simply click on Communication for Interpersonal Relationships. The webinar is hosted by the Department of Defense APAN system, but is open to the public.

If you cannot connect to the APAN site, an alternative viewing of this presentation will be running on YouTube Live. Mobile options for YouTube Live are available on all Apple and Android devices.

 

This MFLN-Military Caregiving concentration blog post was published on September 30, 2016.

 

Part III: Adult Learning – Goal-Oriented & Relevancy-Oriented

Adul Learning Series

In life we are often driven forward by our goals and many of our choices are made based on the relevancy of them. As helping professionals you work with clients who are also goal driven, which leads us to our third principle of adult learning: Goal-Oriented and Relevancy-Oriented. Malcolm Knowles, who is often referred to as the pioneer of adult learning, identified four principles of adult learning: (1) Autonomous and Self-Directed, (2) Life Experiences and Knowledge, (3) Goal-Oriented and Relevancy-Oriented and (4) Practical.

Previously we identified principle (1) Autonomous and Self-Directed as well as (2) Life Experiences and Knowledge, where we encouraged military service providers to relate new information back to the life experiences of their clients as well as their clients’ prior knowledge. This month our focus shifts to principle (3) Goal-Oriented and Relevancy-Oriented.

 

Goal-Oriented and Relevancy-Oriented.

Adults are relevancy-oriented, meaning they need to see a reason for learning something. They are also goal-oriented, needing to see the applicability of the experience in order to also see the value. When training adults remember that a theory will need to be related to practical experiences.

As a service provider, when providing education and training to military families be explicit about your goals for the lesson or training. Help you families by explaining the relevancy of the assignments or activities you’ve asked them to participate in. Also, as a service provider, be sure to provide choices for your families, when appropriate, so that they are able to choose what they consider to be the most relevant.


The MFLN Military Caregiving concentration is beginning to wrap up the Adult Learning Series. Next month we will discuss the final principle of adult learning followed by an explanation of adult learning styles. If you missed our previous posts in this series, you can catch up through our Adult Learning Series homepage.

This MFLN-Military Caregiving concentration blog post was published on September 23, 2016.

Want to add apps to your Dietetics practise?

Flickr CC Clive Darra ios apps taken Aug 12, 2012
Flickr CC Clive Darra ios apps taken Aug 12, 2012

By Joanna Manero, BS,Research Assistant, Graduate Assistant,Master’s Degree Student

It seems like whatever task you can think of, there’s an App, or mobile Smartphone application, that can do just what you need.  Why wouldn’t there be?  The App industry is huge and positioned to clinch the market of 64% of Americans that own a Smartphone device.

As healthcare professionals, it is our job to evolve and find innovative ways to reach our clients to give them the best and most up to date information.  Incorporating Apps in your current practice may help.  Tune into Justine Karduck and Kirsten DiFilippo’s webinar on Wednesday, September  21st at 11:00 AM EDT to learn about the evidence to support or disprove the use of Apps in nutrition education.  You will also learn how Apps can fit into your current practice, and how to evaluate an App.

If you are new to using Apps in your practice and decide to give it a try, you may be wondering if Apps are regulated in any way.  Apple just launched a strict new set of guidelines for health and medical related Apps.   In addition to the guidelines already in place, the updated guidelines focus on privacy protection, inaccurate data, and preventing harmful behavior.  Apple has put emphasis on Apps that are used to diagnose or treat patients.  These features will now require FDA approval.   To learn more about the guidelines in place, visit the links below.

These guidelines make our job of selecting Apps for practice a little easier. However, an App that works for one person may not work for the others.  It is important to understand your client and their goals.  Tune into the webinar to learn more about this process.

Are you using Apps in your practice?  If so, leave us a comment below and tell us about your experience!

References:

http://mobihealthnews.com/content/apples-updated-app-store-guidelines-place-added-scrutiny-health-medical-apps

http://www.fda.gov/MedicalDevices/DigitalHealth/MobileMedicalApplications/default.htm

http://www.pewinternet.org/2015/04/01/us-smartphone-use-in-2015/

This was posted by Robin Allen, a member of the Military Families Learning Network (MFLN) Nutrition and Wellness team that aims to support the development of professionals working with military families.  Find out more about the MFLN Nutrition and Wellness concentration on our website, on Facebookon Twitterand LinkedIn.

Expert Advice Series: TRICARE® ECHO – Applied Behavioral Analysis (ABA)

Expert Advice Series

In a recent webinar entitled “TRICARE® Extended Care Health Option (ECHO)” participants were able to gather more information about the supplemental services for active duty family members with qualifying mental and physical disabilities provided through TRICARE® ECHO.

Question: I had a couple questions regarding the Applied Behavioral Analysis (ABA) referral process and what type of medical equipment is covered by ECHO and what is not. There seems to be a lack of communication between the child’s Primary Care Manager (PCM) and United Health Care (UHC) when sending in a referral for ABA therapy.  Does the ECHO Case Manager have the correct verbiage and time line to share with the families on what the PCM needs to state on the referral prior to sending to UHC to begin the process for ABA services?  A lot of my clients have shared with me that if the PCM does not write the referral on a prescription pad and if the correct verbiage is not written on the referral  that UHC will kick the referral back.  This causes a lot of confusion for the clients and the process to begin the services for their child with Autism takes longer.

Also, is there a list of medical equipment that ECHO does cover when Tri-care does not?  Such as hearing aids, wheel chairs etc.

 

Advice: The ACD policy requires that prior to coverage of ABA, the beneficiary must be diagnosed with ASD using DSM-5 criteria and issued a referral for ABA by a TRICARE-authorized Physician-Primary Care Manager (P-PCM) or by a specialized ASD diagnosing provider whether they work in the purchased care or direct care system.  The medical record and the referral must contain documentation of the Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) diagnosis and documentation of co-morbid psychiatric and medical disorders.  We also require that ASD symptom severity be documented on the referral, but plan to delete this requirement from the referral itself in the next policy update which we expect sometime in FY 2017.

Referrals made for TRICARE Prime beneficiaries from the Direct Care system (the MTF) providers are made electronically in Composite Health Care System (CHCS). These electronic referrals are sent to the regional managed care support contractor for processing. The regional contractor then sends an authorization letter specifying the ABA provider/practice information and the authorization number to each beneficiary.  The Active Duty Family Member (ADFM) parent/caregiver is to call the phone number of the ABA practice on the authorization letter to schedule the appointment for ABA. If the provider cannot see the patient within 28 days, then the ADFM parent/caregiver should directly telephone the regional contractor at the phone number specified in the authorization letter for help getting an appointment with another ABA provider able to see the beneficiary within the 28 day access standard.

For Purchased Care under TRICARE Prime, each regional contractor, in this case UHC, defines their referral requirements. If UHC requires the referral be written on a paper prescription pad, then this is the process that must be followed.  Under TRICARE Standard plans, referrals per se are not used, but rather a prior authorization process if followed. Each regional contractor specifies the process per contractual requirement.  The process may involve filling out a regional contractor online form requesting authorization, faxing in this information on a form or telephoning the regional contractor to request for authorization.  Regardless of each regional contractor’s process, prior authorization is required for ABA services under the ACD. Each authorization is for six months.

I hope this answers your question.  Each regional contractor is available per the phone numbers provided in the presentation to assist family members with the referrals and authorizations. Please encourage the families you assist to call the regional contractor whenever there are problems or challenges accessing ABA through the ACD as we do not want beneficiaries to wait to access ABA services.

 

Expert: Theresa A. Hart, RNC MS, Nurse Consultant/Program Manager, Perinatal, Pediatrics and Special Medical Programs Defense Health Agency Clinical Support Division

For more advice from Ms. Hart, watch and listen to the professional development training on TRICARE® Extended Care Health Option (ECHO) to learn about the ECHO program.


The new blog series provides monthly advice from subject matter experts on issues surrounding military caregiving for service providers and families. We take questions and concerns from military helping professionals and families and provide the necessary feedback from credible experts in the field of study. Whether you are a provider or a caregiver, what questions do you have? We want to hear from you.

 

This MFLN-Military Caregiving concentration blog post was published on September 16, 2016.

 

Off the Shelf: Conversations with Authors of Children’s Books

The Family Development Early Intervention team is always on the look-out for quality children’s books that help address some of the unique needs of military children.

The following is an interview with Brenda Ehrmantraut, author of several children’s books, including Night Catch, a story for military children facing the deployment of a parent.  This interview has been edited for length and clarity.

Night Catch (Published by Bubble Gum Press)
Night Catch (Published by Bubble Gum Press)

What, if any, experiences do you and/or your book’s illustrator have with the military?

I’m a civilian! However, the book was inspired when my brother served in The Army National Guard and was deployed to Iraq in 2004.

What made you decide to write this book? Was there some incident or experience with the military that inspired you?

When a community sends a National Guard Unit off, there is an indescribable feeling of bonding. Everyone wants to step up to help. When my brother deployed, I felt overwhelmed with feelings of fear and helplessness. I wanted to do something, and writing a book was my answer. I was worried about him being away from his family for a year.

What message(s) do you hope that children and families receive as a result of reading your book?

My greatest desire in writing it was to offer comfort and hope to families in times of separation and stress. The book was deliberately designed to have a calming effect. The rhyme is a soothing technique, like a bedtime rock-a-bye. The pictures, and story, play with fantasy a bit, but also are relatable to a child. Here’s a bedroom. Here’s a house with a mother. And even though the star cannot actually be moved, the game of blowing it back and forth each night is a tangible connection for a young child.

Have you received any feedback from military families after they read your book, and if so, what have they said?

I hear from a lot of families who read the story while they are apart. It doesn’t seem to have an age limit. I’ve heard of dads in tears, a 5th grader who carried it around in his school backpack the year his dad was gone, and even parents who have children in the military and they are keeping a copy of the book handy. Connection seems to speak to everyone.

Are there any other books for military children that you would suggest for young children?

The Military Child Education Coalition has a program called, “Tell Me a Story” which promotes reading in military families. Night Catch is one of the books included in their reading list.

This post was edited by Robyn DiPietro-Wells & Michaelene Ostrosky, PhD, members of the MFLN FD Early Intervention team, which aims to support the development of professionals working with military families. Find out more about the Military Families Learning Network FD concentration on our website, on Facebook, on Twitter, and YouTube.

Meet Our Presenters for the September 21 Webinar “Mobile Apps for RDNs in Patient Care: What Does the Evidence Say?”

Can’t wait for this webinar! Mobile Apps for RDNs in Patient Care: What Does the Evidence Say?

Please join us Wednesday, September 21 at 10:00 am CDT for a free webinar on cDietitians earn 1.0 CPEU.

To Register: https://learn.extension.org/events/2693

Kristen DiFilippo, MS, RDN, LDN, Ph.D. candidate in Nutritional Sciences, University of Illinois

Kristen DiFilippo

Kristen DiFilippo received her Masters of Science in Family and Consumer Sciences with a focus in Dietetics from Eastern Illinois University. She is currently working on her Ph.D. in Nutritional Sciences at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Her research is focused on the role of mobile apps in nutrition-related programs. Kristen DiFilippo focused on eating disorders and weight management when she worked at the Mettler Center as a Registered Dietitian. She also worked at Eastern Illinois University, Parkland College, and Lake Land College where she was an instructor for various nutrition courses. In September, Kirsten DiFilippo will be presenting alongside Justine Karduck on our upcoming webinar about Mobile Apps for RDNs in Patient Care: What Does the Evidence Say?

Justine Karduck, MS, RDN, LDN, CDE Ph.D. student and Director of the Didactic Program in Dietetics, University of Illinois

Justine Karduck

Justine Karduck received her Masters of Science in Nutritional Sciences from the University of Illinois. She is studying mobile apps in the clinical management of type 2 diabetes as a Ph.D. student in the Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition at the University of Illinois. Her Dietetic Internship was completed in Danville IL through the VA Illiana Health Care System and is now the Director of the Didactic Program in Dietetics at the University of Illinois. Justine Karduck is a Registered Dietitian Nutritionist and is a Certified Diabetes Educator. She also takes part in Military Family Learning Network where she is the Professional Education Coordinator in the Nutrition and Wellness concentration.

Tune in to learn more about our presenters and the roles mobile apps have in the field of dietetics.

This post was written by Robin Allen, a member of the Military Families Learning Network (MFLN) Nutrition and Wellness team that aims to support the development of professionals working with military families.  Find out more about the MFLN Nutrition and Wellness concentration on our website, on Facebookon Twitterand LinkedIn.